Copyright: Anton Lebedev

Glucosamine Mimics Low-Carb Diet, Promotes Longevity

According to researchers, glucosamine may mimic a low-carb diet by improving glucose metabolism, thus promoting longevity.

Led by German medical researcher, Michael Ristow, a team of researchers conducted tests at ETH Zurich and several other German research institutions. There, aging mice were fed glucosamine in addition to their regular diet. The glucosamine-fed mice were then compared against a control group of mice that had not received glucosamine.

At the conclusion of the study, the glucosamine-fed mice experienced a 10% increase in longevity compared to the control group.*This is equivalent to approximately 8 additional years of human lifespan.

Additionally, researchers found that the introduction of glucosamine into the diets of the elderly mice improved their metabolism, something that may indicate protection from diabetes (the most prevalent disease found among the elderly).

How Glucosamine Mimics A Low-Carb Diet

Research reveals that when ingested, glucosamine helps promote the breakdown of amino acids. Amino acids are key components of proteins, and in the absence of carbohydrates, amino acids are metabolized.

German medical researcher, Michael Ristow, cited this process as being similar to what occurs when someone is put on a low-carb diet. The implication here is that by adding glucosamine to your diet, you wouldn’t necessarily have to reduce your uptake of carbohydrates.

Besides not having any known side effects, glucosamine is beneficial for a number of reasons.

Benefits of Glucosamine

As was demonstrated in the study, glucosamine proves to be beneficial to the overall health of both animals and humans. There are also additional benefits to consuming glucosamine, some of which include:

  • Prevents joint degeneration (by increasing cartilage production)
  • Reduces joint discomfort & pain
  • May delay cancer growth
  • Reduces metabolism of nutritive sugars

source: Science Daily

Suggested Reading:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3141631/

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